Thursday, 24 November 2011

Mexican Folk Costumes - Jalisco


I'm in love with Mexican folk costumes at the moment, and today I thought I'd share with you the outfits from the Mexican state of Jalisco. Many things thought of as characteristically Mexican, such as tequila, mariachis, sombrero hats, and ranchero music originated in Jalisco.


 The style of these dresses was an imitation of Spanish court dress, but make in cotton rather than expensive silks and brocades.  The dress grew in popularity during the Mexican Revolution (which began in 1910 and lasted into the 1920s) and was worn by a number of famous female soldiers.  

Image from Tuscon Citizen

The dress is actually a skirt and blouse of the same colour.  The full skirt is edged with a ruffle, usually about 35cm wide, which is decorated with ten strips of ribbon in contrasting colours to the skirt.  The blouse has elbow-length sleeves, and a v-shaped ruffled which starts on the shoulders and descends to the waist at front and back.

 Image from Solpersona
These days they are worn by dancers from performing a traditional Mexican dance form called Baile Folklórico.  Literally meaning "folkloric dance" in Spanish, the dance is a combination of local folk dances with balletic moves such as pointed toes and exaggerated movements. In Jalisco it is danced to the music of a mariachi band.



Each region in Mexico is known for its own particular dances, and the dance form is also found in the Southwestern US, and Central American countries. Each region also has its own particular costume, with the most well-known styles coming from Jalisco, Vera Cruz, Sinaloa and Yucatan.  

3 comments:

  1. I love the picture of the dancer in the yellow dress. I started painting watercolors a few years ago and wanted to know if I could have permission to use the Jalisco dancer in yellow as a model for a new painting?
    m_davis@bresnan.net

    ReplyDelete
  2. One of the great representations for the Mexican flag is their national costume. There's not a type of dress that could be totally considered as 'traditional' Mexican costume due to the complicated history of Mexico. Possibly Mayan clothing, since it was made and dressed in before the invasion by the Spanish people is the most really traditional.

    ReplyDelete
  3. That is so kool that u did this! I am from a mexican family myself but i was born in the USA & proud of it but i am very proud of my heratage too!

    ReplyDelete